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Maryland Laws Against Robbery, Armed Robbery, and Carjacking

Robbery

Under Maryland state law, robbery is a crime of violence that involves the use of force or the threat of force. When a perpetrator uses these tactics to steal property or obtain services unlawfully, it qualifies as robbery. There are generally three different categories of robbery crimes in Maryland.

  1. Robbery

Maryland Code of Criminal Law Section 3-401 provides the definition of robbery. Under state law, robbery occurs when a perpetrator uses force or threats to take property or obtain services from another person unlawfully.

When the robbery concerns property, Maryland state law requires proof that the perpetrator intended to:

  • Deprive the owner of the property permanently;
  • Hold the property in order to appropriate at least part of its value;
  • Offer to return the property only upon payment of a ransom, reward, or other compensation; or
  • Alter or dispose of the property such that the owner is unlikely to recover it.

Under Maryland Code of Criminal Law Section 3-402, it is illegal to commit — or attempt to commit — robbery. Any person who violates Section 3-402 can be charged with a felony. Upon conviction, the offender is potentially subject to a 15-year sentence in prison.

  1. Armed Robbery

Maryland Code of Criminal Law Section 3-403 outlines the definition of armed robbery. Under state law, a standard robbery crime becomes armed robbery if the perpetrator:

  • Has a dangerous weapon while committing the offense; or
  • Displays a written note claiming to have a dangerous weapon while committing the offense.

Under Section 3-403, it is illegal to commit — or attempt to commit — armed robbery. Any person who violates Section 3-403 can be charged with a felony. Upon conviction, the offender is potentially subject to a 20-year sentence in prison.

  1. Carjacking

Maryland Code of Criminal Law Section 3-405 details the definition of carjacking. Under state law, carjacking occurs when a perpetrator:

  • Takes unauthorized possession of a motor vehicle that belongs to another person; and
  • Uses force or violence, or the threat of force or violence, to take unauthorized possession of the motor vehicle in question.

Section 3-405 also specifies the definition of armed carjacking. Under state law, a standard carjacking crime becomes armed carjacking if the perpetrator employs or displays a dangerous weapon while committing the offense.

Under Section 3-405, it is illegal to commit — or attempt to commit — carjacking or armed carjacking. Any person who violates Section 3-405 can be charged with a felony. Upon conviction, the offender is potentially subject to a 30-year sentence in prison.

Reach Out to Us Today for Help

If you are facing charges for robbery, armed robbery, or carjacking in Maryland, it can be distinctly beneficial to reach out to an established criminal defense attorney. The attorneys at Schlaich & Thompson, Chartered in Bel Air, Maryland, have more than 60 years of combined legal experience in criminal and family law, including robbery, armed robbery, and carjacking. If you need legal help, contact us today for an initial consultation.

Resource:

mgaleg.maryland.gov/webmga/frmStatutesText.aspx?article=gcr&section=3-401&ext=html&session=2019RS&tab=subject5

https://www.stclaw.net/how-does-maryland-law-address-different-types-of-robbery/

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